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depression

Recurrent Depression

Someone with persistent depression (previously referred to as dysthymic disorder) has a depressed mood for most of the day, most of the week, for at least 24 months. It involves repeated depressive episodes.  In teenagers and children, the mood can be irritable or depressed, and must continue for at least 12 months.

In addition to depressed mood, symptoms of depression include lack of focus, fatigue, low self-esteem, feelings of hopelessness, hypersomnia, insomnia, difficulty making decisions, feelings of guilt, anxiety, eating disorders and even symptoms hard to explain by medical diagnosis.

Depression often begins in childhood, adolescence, or early adulthood. It affects an estimated 0.5% of adults in the United States. Individuals with persistent depressive disorder often describe their mood as low-spirited and gloomy. Because these symptoms have become a part of the individual’s day-to-day experience, they may not seek help, just assuming that they have always felt this way.

depression treatment portrait sitting women girl home young flat apartment sad living brunette serious feeling stress

depression treatment portrait sitting women girl home young flat apartment sad living brunette serious feeling stress

The symptoms cause significant distress or difficulty in work, social mingling, or other important aspects. While the impact of persistent depression on work, relationships and daily life can vary widely, its effects are greater than those of major depressive disorder